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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1969). Homosexual Behavior Among Males: A Cross Cultural and Cross Species Investigation. Wainwright Churchill. New York: Hawthorn Books, 1967. ix + 349 pp.. Psychoanal. Rev., 56C(3):489.

(1969). Psychoanalytic Review, 56C(3):489

Homosexual Behavior Among Males: A Cross Cultural and Cross Species Investigation. Wainwright Churchill. New York: Hawthorn Books, 1967. ix + 349 pp.

The author, a prominent psychotherapist, received his psychoanalytic training from Dr. Theodor Reik. Dr. Ashley Montague has characterized this book as “one of the best things written on the subject of male homosexuality.”

Dr. Churchill explores the sexual behavior of many cultures from the Greeks and Romans to the present, from ancient tribal to modern primitive cultures. The sexual behavior of the Americas and Europe, and even of nonhuman species is examined for frequency of and attitude towards male homosexuality.

This book is of importance to the profession because even among therapists the whole topic of male homosexuality is still beset by misunderstanding, prejudice, stereotyping and dishonesty. This comprehensive study approaches the subject as a fact of life rather than as a sin, a crime or a disease.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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