Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see translations of Freud SE or GW…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When you hover your mouse over a paragraph of the Standard Edition (SE) long enough, the corresponding text from Gesammelte Werke slides from the bottom of the PEP-Web window, and vice versa.

If the slide up window bothers you, you can turn it off by checking the box “Turn off Translations” in the slide-up.  But if you’ve turned it off, how do you turn it back on?  The option to turn off the translations only is effective for the current session (it uses a stored cookie in your browser).  So the easiest way to turn it back on again is to close your browser (all open windows), and reopen it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Freedman, N. Bucci, W. (1983). The Orthogenetic Principle and Psychoanalysis. Psychoanal. Rev., 70(3):347-357.

(1983). Psychoanalytic Review, 70(3):347-357

SPECIAL BOOK REVIEWS

The Orthogenetic Principle and Psychoanalysis

Review by:
Norbert Freedman

Wilma Bucci

Developmental processes: heinz werners selected writings. Edited by Sybil S. Barten and Margery B. Franklin. New York: International Universities Press, Vol. 1 and 2, 1978

Unlike the characters in Pirandello's play, psychoanalysis is not in search of an author. It has had its author for the last century. But like the characters, perhaps, psychoanalysis has been in search of a conceptual schema, a model which can break its intellectual isolation and serve as an organizing frame of reference for analytic findings.

Reviewing the history of psychoanalytic thought, we can distinguish several attempts to formulate psychoanalytic concepts within an integrating framework or model drawn from another scientific domain. They have varying degrees of cogency, and all are more or less wanting. First there is the neurophysiological model marked by Freud's “Project for a Scientific Psychology”. While this approach has generally fallen into disuse, several of Freud's early concepts have recently been reexamined by Pribram and Gill (1976). Next there is the sociological or anthropological model, as revealed in Freud's “Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego” and “Civilization and its Discontents”. More recently, there have been attempts within American psychology to incorporate psychoanalytic concepts within a behavioral and associationist approach, as represented by the work of

- 347 -

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2018, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.