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Furman, E. (1973). A Contribution to Assessing the Role of Infantile Separation-Individuation in Adolescent Development. Psychoanal. St. Child, 28:193-207.

(1973). Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, 28:193-207

A Contribution to Assessing the Role of Infantile Separation-Individuation in Adolescent Development

Erna Furman

THERE ARE MANY ASPECTS OF ADOLESCENT BEHAVIOR AND MENTAL functioning which remind us of the toddler and which form parallels between these two different periods of psychic growth, e.g., the intensity of the drives, the presence of pregenital drive components, the use of primitive defenses, the changes in the nature of the self and object representations and the cathectic shifts which accompany them, the new identifications and new investments of the body image and of ego activities. Such similarities between toddler and adolescent are striking enough to make it important to explore and understand the relationship between the two developmental phases. Our interest is further heightened when, as analysts and parents, we are impressed by the extent of the adolescent's inner turmoil and his struggles for mastery and integration.

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