Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see Abram’s analysis of Winnicott’s theories…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

In-depth analysis of Winnicott’s psychoanalytic theorization was conducted by Jan Abrams in her work The Language of Winnicott. You can access it directly by clicking here.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Tulley, M.M. (2000). Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications. Cassidy, Jude and Shaver, Phillip R. New York: Guilford Press, 1999, 925 pages.. Psychoanal. Soc. Work, 7(3):79-85.
  

(2000). Psychoanalytic Social Work, 7(3):79-85

Book Reviews

Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications. Cassidy, Jude and Shaver, Phillip R. New York: Guilford Press, 1999, 925 pages.

Review by:
Margaret M. Tulley, M.S.W.

This is an impressive, comprehensive volume which explores a wide range of attachment topics. It should be considered an essential reference book for mental health practitioners who provide treatment to people of all ages. However it also has great potential value, as a reference tool, for researchers, early interventionists, school counselors, etc. The book is dedicated to John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth, and explores attachment theory as developed by John Bowlby, and furthered by his research assistant Mary Ainsworth, who did pioneering research known as the Strange Situation. Attachment theory has assumed more and more importance for clinicians as solid research continues to yield impressive results. “In the fields of social and emotional development, attachment theory is the most visible and empirically grounded conceptual framework” (p. x). Clinical reports on the impact of early parent/child relationships lean heavily on attachment theory. But the rapidly growing body of research influenced by attachment theory extends beyond the period of infancy and early childhood and is investigating adolescent and adult relationships. As originally theorized by Bowlby, attachment issues extend across the life span and attachment related behaviors do not constitute ‘regression’ when experienced beyond childhood. This rich and expanding body of research has gone in new directions and is most effective when informed by clinical work; the former must use generalities and the latter examines the specific events in an individual's life.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.