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Freud, S. (1925). Josef Breuer. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume XIX (1923-1925): The Ego and the Id and Other Works, 277-280.

Freud, S. (1925). [SES277a1]Josef Breuer. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume XIX (1923-1925): The Ego and the Id and Other Works, 277-280

[SES277a1]Josef Breuer Book Information Previous Up Next Language Translation

Sigmund Freud

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[SES277a2]Editor's Note to "Josef Breuer"

[SES277a3](a) German Editions:

[SES277a4]1925 Josef Breuer Int. Z. Psychoanal., 11 (2), 255-6.

[SES277a5]1928 Josef Breuer G.S., 11, 281-3.

[SES277a6]1948 Josef Breuer G.W., 14, 562-3.

[SES277a7](b) English Translation:

[SES277a8]1925 Josef Breuer Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 6 (4), 459-60. (Tr. unnamed.)

[SES277a9]The present translation is a new one by James Strachey.

[SES277a10]The last dozen lines of this obituary were quoted at the end of the Editor's Introduction to Studies on Hysteria (1895d), Standard Ed., 2, xxviii, where a discussion will also be found of the scientific relations between the two collaborators.

[SES277a11]Josef Breuer

[SES277a12]On June 20, 1925, there died in Vienna, in his eighty-fourth year, Josef Breuer, the creator of the cathartic method, whose name is for that reason indissolubly linked with the beginnings of psycho-analysis.

[SES277a13]Breuer was a physician, a pupil of the clinician Oppolzer. In his youth he had worked at the physiology of respiration under Ewald Hering, and later, in the scanty hours of leisure allowed by an extensive medical practice, he occupied himself successfully with experiments on the function of the vestibular apparatus in animals. Nothing in his education could lead one to expect that he would gain the first decisive insight into the age-old riddle of the hysterical neurosis and would make a contribution of imperishable value to our knowledge of the human mind.

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