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Wallerstein, R.S. (2003). The Nature of Psychoanalysis as a Science: Robert S. Wallerstein, M.D, Presented on Sept 8, 2003. San Fran. Ctr Psa., 1:1.

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(2003). San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis, 1:1

San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis

The Nature of Psychoanalysis as a Science: Robert S. Wallerstein, M.D, Presented on Sept 8, 2003

Robert S. Wallerstein, M.D.

In this film, recorded in September 2003, Robert Wallerstein, M.D. offers his thoughts on psychoanalysis as a science, drawing on Freud's original theory regarding the discipline as a natural science, as opposed to the contemporary notion that it is instead a social, linguistic and/or behavioral science. Dr. Wallerstein states that “Psychoanalysis can be or should be a scientific enterprise,” and he presents his case for psychoanalysis as an empirical discipline which can benefit from experimentation and a verifiable research process. Dr. Wallerstein discusses psychoanalytic researchers past and present, using his work in the 1950s at the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas as an example of psychoanalytic work that was evaluated in terms of efficacy and results.

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