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Yassa, M. (2001). Käurlek Och Hat I Psykoanalytiska Institutioner (Love and hate in psychoanalytic institutions). Jurgen Reeder. Stockholm: Symposion, 2001.. Scand. Psychoanal. Rev., 24(2):134-135.

(2001). Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review, 24(2):134-135

Käurlek Och Hat I Psykoanalytiska Institutioner (Love and hate in psychoanalytic institutions). Jurgen Reeder. Stockholm: Symposion, 2001.

Review by:
Maria Yassa

In his book “Kärlek och hat …”, Reeder discusses psychoanalytic organizations in general, and psychoanalytic training - with the very special form of learning that it implies-in particular. It is no news that psychoanalytic training is a thoroughly demanding process; intellectually, emotionally, not to say practically. Here, the candiate's meeting with her/his Psychoanalytic Society and Training Institute has a crucial significance for the moulding of her/his relationship to what Reeder calls the praxis of psychoanalysis, i.e., the application of the values and ethos inherent in psychoanalysis in relation to analysands and to the bulk of psychoanalytic knowledge.

Reeder's approach to his subject is contextual and historical. He quotes Bálint's historical division of psychoanalytic organizations into three epochs. The first of these coincides with those pioneering years when Freud gathered a group of people of diverse professional backgrounds for a relatively informal “training”. This period was characterized by psychoanalysis not yet having received the status of a profession, by pioneering spirit and innovative verve. The second epoch began with Max Eitington's founding of the Berlin institute in 1920, with its double aim: the creation of a formalized training programme for psychoanalysis, and the founding of a clinic with the ambition of offering psychoanalytic treatment to the broad layers of the population. The Berlin Institute thus laid the foundations for the tripartite model that to this day shapes as good as all psychoanalytic training, consisting of training analysis, supervised cases, and theoretical and technical seminars.

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