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Sirola, R. (2012). Then. Poems 1945 - 2005 By; Veikko Tähkä. Helsinki: Culturamed. Scand. Psychoanal. Rev., 35(2):135-136.

(2012). Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review, 35(2):135-136

Then. Poems 1945 - 2005 By; Veikko Tähkä. Helsinki: Culturamed

Review by:
Riitta Sirola

But the Greatest of All is Love With gratitude to Veikko Tähkä for his cooperation, help and moments of discussion at the time of writing the original article

My hands were slightly trembling when I opened the letter containing the manuscript of a collection of poems by Veikko Tähkä sent by the publisher. A wish had been expressed that I write a review of it to the journal Culturamed. The poet Veikko Tähkä? What on earth was this? Poems from a period of 50 years. Then, during a silent night I dared to read the poems through page by page. They seemed to reflect a structure that had to do with his life's course. The collection comprises 6 parts: Post Bellum, On the road, A New Song, Songs at the Bank, The Last Ones and, finally, The Epilogue. I was hesitant at first - could I reach the complex, rich and wise world of experience of Veikko Tähkä's poems at all? Not to speak of the inner feelings of men returning from the front after the end of the war in 1945, who were floundering in a home that had changed to the unrecognizable with the hand of death still around their necks.

I see blood streaming

to the ripe green of the grass

My mind flashes - contrast colours

and there is nothing left of my comrades face.

… and the wagons of death drive past me strangely meaningless.

p. 10 (Post Bellum)

Reading the pages I felt restful, at times my eyes turned wet from tears and sometimes even brought me to a tender laughter.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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