Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To use the Information icon…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

The Information icon  (an i in a circle) will give you valuable information about PEP Web data and features. You can find it besides a PEP Web feature and the author’s name in every journal article. Simply move the mouse pointer over the icon and click on it for the information to appear.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Haynal, A. (1992). Introduction to The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi, Volume 1. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 1, 1908-1914, xvii-xxxv.
    

Haynal, A. (1992). Introduction to The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi, Volume 1. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 1, 1908-1914, xvii-xxxv

Introduction to The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi, Volume 1 Book Information Previous Up Next

André Haynal

Translated by:
Maria Louise Ascher

Before we Survey the eventful history of these letters, which are being published here for the first time, the people who played major roles should be introduced. Let me begin with the individuals who devoted their time and attention to this correspondence, and then present the two writers themselves.

Elma, the elder daughter of Sándor Ferenczi's wife, Gizella (she was the child of her mother's first marriage, to Géza Pálos), married an American named Hervé Laurvik. This union lasted only briefly, but it gave Elma American citizenship and enabled her to spend the years during the Second World War working at the U.S. embassy in Bern. After the war she persuaded her mother, now widowed, to move to Bern. At that time Anna Freud, who had accompanied her father into exile, was the director of the Hampstead Clinic in London. She worked jointly with Gizella as the representative of the Freud family's interests.

Michael Balint, a psychoanalyst originally from Budapest, and Sándor Ferenczi's most faithful and original disciple, emigrated to London in 1939. He brought with him the theories elaborated by the Budapest school, blended with his own ideas, and he strove to strengthen the reputation of his teacher, whose significance was at that time largely underrated.1

Sándor Ferenczi came from a family of Polish Jews who had emigrated to Hungary. His father, filled with enthusiasm for the liberal, progressivist, and nationalist revolution of 1848, had joined the insurgents and later, in 1879, had Magyarized his name from Fraenkel to Ferenczi.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.