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Ferenczi, S. (1914). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, October 27, 1914. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 19-21.

Ferenczi, S. (1914). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, October 27, 1914. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 19-21

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, October 27, 1914 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

October 27, 1914
Dear Professor,

I will—I believe—have to conduct our correspondence, at least in part, on an analytical basis; the sudden breaking off of our doctor-patient relationship (you see, I am writing as if in free association) would otherwise be all too painful for me. In addition, difficult to carry out.—

I will report historically. The way to Pápa seemed infinitely long, and even so I was already in the barracks around six o'clock and learned that I would have to perform local duties. My unconscious seemed so gratified by this news that it immediately began substitutive gratification in the form of diarrhea. I have now been here for three days and can summarize my impressions for you.

The commandant is a fine and amiable man, as are the other officers (Hussars); with the exception of two rich Jews, lots of “Gentry,”1 “finance officers,” and a few aristocrats. All very comradely to me; certainly the doctor, who can give testimonials, is now a particularly powerful person. We now have here so-called replacement companies, whose task it is to cover the departure of troops and to train recruits. I work from eight until half past eleven in the morning; in the afternoon I have nothing to do.

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