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Freud, S. (1918). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, March 17, 1918. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 272-273.

Freud, S. (1918). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, March 17, 1918. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 272-273

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, March 17, 1918 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, March 17, 1918
IX., Berggasse 19

Dear friend,

This week I was overly busy with ten analyses, it was only for that reason that I left your letter unanswered. Today I am replying that the “material” arrived long ago, whereas Eitingon's is being deposited in weekly installments.

I am awaiting your reports about Csorbató in great suspense, since the sphere of possible places to stay in the summer seems to be getting smaller and smaller.

I accept your theories of hypochondria with little scientific interest, inasmuch as being ill creates little advantage for such organic investigations. I am in favor of your getting well, that you also aren't permitted to spurn the altitude, and not without concern as to whether everything is in order concerning Frau G.

Hollós will have brought you direct news from me. His work inhibition, which I studied in nine days, is probably based on the fact that he has brought things far enough against his father. He came to me in order to establish that I, when looked at from close up, am not worth much. Dr. Freund, who is in Budapest over Sunday, has his postoperative psychosis well behind him. The hypochondriacal delusional idea has, so to speak, withdrawn into a “retirement home” and left the scene to the hysterical neurosis for which he is now doing a regular analysis.

Up until a few days ago we had all three warriors in the house, “Rossau Barracks,”1 as my wife said.

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