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Freud, S. (1918). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, April 7, 1918. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919, 275.

Freud, S. (1918). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, April 7, 1918. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sandor Ferenczi Volume 2, 1914-1919 , 275

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, April 7, 1918 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, April 7, 1918
IX., Berggasse 19

Dear friend,

The beggarliness of these times, which is not unfamiliar to you, prompts me again to ask you for something, namely, to send the enclosed letter more or less translated to the health management of Matlárháza. I have no reason to assume, of course, that these high officials understand German, or my German in particular, and I may assume that they would gladly use this as an excuse to turn us down. But Matlárháza would be very nice for us. From Czorbató we have only received the news that the negotiations with the bank have not been concluded; the big hotel in Lomnitz would hardly come into consideration for us, and in Matlárháza we would also have the company of Kata Lévy, with whom we would like to be together. We can't count on a summer sojourn in Austria this season.

Don't be frightened by my writing! Its unmistakable deterioration lately has been traced to gouty pains (age arthritis) in my right hand. Unpleasure naturally also plays a part in this.

Dr. Freund is now sorting out a piece of his old neurosis here. He is free of delusion, but still in an uneven mood. His desire to help is now coming to the fore; he also wants to help me, and in the process he has expressed an intention about which I would even have very much liked to hear your view. His overpayment is also worthy of note.

I recently spoke with Heller, who is slowly recovering from some shock or other. He has accepted my fourth volume in principle, likewise your book of the four essays, but is naturally making it contingent on the procurement of paper and will have to be pushed repeatedly,- but the matter is such that he can't refuse you permission to publish with the other publisher, even if he himself has to refuse and the works have appeared shortly before in the Zeitschrift. You know, of course, one never gets done with him all at once.

Ernst is confronting the superarbitrium on the 14th, Anna her examination on the 15th of the month. I greet you and Frau G. cordially and thank you energetically.

Yours,

Freud

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