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Ferenczi, S. (1920). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, April 18, 1920. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 15-17.

Ferenczi, S. (1920). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, April 18, 1920. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 15-17

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, April 18, 1920 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Dr. Ferenczi Sándor
idegorvos1
Budapest, April 18, 1920

Dear Professor,

Already more than two weeks have again passed since I left Vienna without my having decided to write a letter. To be sure, nothing out of the ordinary has happened since then. For a few days I was still half-living in the memories of Vienna, but soon everything moved into the far distance; the everyday interests and the local difficulties absorb a great deal of interest. What is left is dedicated to Ψα (as science). The Society is very busy; we are working almost every Sunday. Today we heard an outstanding lecture by a henceforth accepted member by the name of Aurel Kolnai about “Psychoanalysis and Sociology.”2 One would never have ascribed so much ψα understanding to a man who has hitherto been so distant from us. Since I know your current interest in questions of group psychology,3 I am having the paper sent directly to your address. You will certainly find points of contact in his remarks. A little paper by Hermann4 is being sent along with it.

A brief train of thought about “Group Psychology”: Should not ambivalence, the division of antagonistic strivings into two separate psychic acts, be brought into relation with the beginning formation of the ego ideal out of the common ego? The hostile impulse toward the father is an attempt to realize the ideal of becoming a father; the subordinating, [the] impulse to obedience (that of suggestibility in the tendency on which “paternal hypnosis”5 is based), would be the more primitive (group) mode of reaction.

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