Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To sort articles by Rank…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can specify Rank as the sort order when searching (it’s the default) which will put the articles which best matched your search on the top, and the complete results in descending relevance to your search. This feature is useful for finding the most important articles on a specific topic.

You can also change the sort order of results by selecting rank at the top of the search results pane after you perform a search. Note that rank order after a search only ranks up to 1000 maximum results that were returned; specifying rank in the search dialog ranks all possibilities before choosing the final 1000 (or less) to return.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Ferenczi, S. (1920). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, June 4, 1920. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 23-28.

Ferenczi, S. (1920). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, June 4, 1920. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 23-28

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, June 4, 1920 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Budapest, June 4, 1920

D[ear]. Pr[ofessor]!

I hope you [are] already in possession of my letter, which I had to get to you by means of Eisler's mediation, so that now—unrelated to your last, gratifying news (fund)—I can discuss purely personal matters, which are nonetheless not uninteresting scientifically (to me); therewith I also accede to your request to write “personal things” about myself.—

Point of departure is the analysis of Frau Dr. Sokolnicka, which I would now like to summarize in more detail. You recall that she—without producing any other nervous symptoms—was incapable of achieving full sexual satisfaction with a man, so that she always indulged in self-gratification. Rank's wedding1 made her fall unhappily in love with him, after the fact, although, where she might still have had an opportunity to do so, she was unable to love him totally. She came with complaints against you. You had turned her down only because of money matters, you see, you are such that you don't like to accept money from poor people, and out of that personal motive you interrupted her almost finished analysis.—The divorce from her husband was well on its way on her arrival and seems now to be ended. It ended with a dispute over money between the marriage partners, in which she, in part, got the short end of the stick. Nonetheless, behind the exaggerated propriety in money matters, her original inclination toward getting justice and her sensitivity in questions of money came to the fore in this dispute.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.