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Ferenczi, S. (1921). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, March [6], 1921. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 50-51.

Ferenczi, S. (1921). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, March [6], 1921. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 50-51

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, March [6], 1921 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Budapest, March [6], 19211

Dear Professor,

I probably don't need to write any more about the case of Sokolnicka. She has, I believe, made not insignificant progress in the development of her personality; one cannot call her cured. She was a very uncomfortable patient; I became practiced in patience and consideration in her analysis. I would still be interested to know how she behaved with you. She must certainly have scolded me thoroughly.—

I thank you for the willingness with which the Verlag decided to publish my works,2 and I thank you in the name of the Budapest group for the honoring recognition that you expressed about their achievements. In today's session I was able to promulgate your praise in a festive manner.

Today Eisler gave a lecture on, acually a review of, your “Beyond”3 Aside from a few misunderstandings, the work is quite good and—as is always the case with Eisler—also well written. The discussion was lively.

The American's offer sounds so good in the new version that I would like to ask you to find out about the man and his offer from Frink,4 when he arrives, and also to ask Frink whether I—especially if I practice English somewhat—would be suited for this position. We have calculated that in one, at most two years there, I could save so much that, if necessary (e.g., in case of illness!), I could live modestly on it.

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