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Ferenczi, S. (1923). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, March 14, 1923. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 95-96.

Ferenczi, S. (1923). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, March 14, 1923. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 95-96

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, March 14, 1923 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Budapest, March 14, 1923

Dear Professor,

The main purpose of my letter of today is to give a report about the case of Dr. Feldmann.—After receiving the reply from Rank's and your side, I had him come immediately and presented him with my demand. He was quite dismayed and bewildered—but then he poured forth complaints about the unfairness of the judgment, although he admitted that he did not presume any bad will on my part (at most exaggerated, indeed, unjustified caution). I treated him as if he were a patient suffering from character defects, whom it would be impossible for me to entrust with the treatment of neurotics and allow to retain membership. Finally, he promised to send the document of resignation. Today he came again and wanted to have the whole thing viewed in a much milder light; when he saw my inflexibility, he asked if he wouldn't be allowed to remain a member, he would no longer ask for patients and intended to stay away from meetings. I denied these requests and told him that my main concern was precisely that he should resign from the Association. He had, incidentally,—so I told him—already announced his resignation verbally; this declaration had been acknowledged by me and communicated to you (Herr Professor). Then he requested to make the above request to you personally, which I advised him against. Then he asked at least to be allowed to ask for your opinion in writing. I also forbade him that; but I finally promised that I will ask you.

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