Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see translations of Freud SE or GW…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When you hover your mouse over a paragraph of the Standard Edition (SE) long enough, the corresponding text from Gesammelte Werke slides from the bottom of the PEP-Web window, and vice versa.

If the slide up window bothers you, you can turn it off by checking the box “Turn off Translations” in the slide-up. But if you’ve turned it off, how do you turn it back on? The option to turn off the translations only is effective for the current session (it uses a stored cookie in your browser). So the easiest way to turn it back on again is to close your browser (all open windows), and reopen it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Ferenczi, S. (1923). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, June 14, 1923. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 106-107.

Ferenczi, S. (1923). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, June 14, 1923. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 106-107

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, June 14, 1923 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Budapest, June 14, 1923

Dear Professor,

The bad news about your dear little grandson's severe illness1 has deeply saddened us. These are the cases in which one catches oneself still having expected some “providence” or “justice”; one is outraged over the dumb, blind—one would like to say—evil, fate.

I have the news from Lajos Lévy, who seems, by the way, to have given up his trip to Vienna after receiving your letter.

In my affair, in which you are so thoroughly interested, we intend to decide with all necessary caution. These next few days I am still having myself examined by a laryngologist, then (after another X-ray examination) again by the surgeon and Lévy.

This episode disturbed my practice quite severely. In consideration of the possibility of an operation in the second half of June, I had to give notice for June 15 to the patients who are to be let go (among them, Frau D[r.?] Herford,2 who has improved significantly and become smarter). Now that the decision is being postponed, many hours remain empty for me; naturally, I can no longer accept new patients.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.