Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To refine your search with the author’s first initial…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

If you get a large number of results after searching for an article by a specific author, you can refine your search by adding the author’s first initial. For example, try writing “Freud, S.” in the Author box of the Search Tool.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Ferenczi, S. (1925). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 17, 1925. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 199-200.

Ferenczi, S. (1925). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 17, 1925. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 199-200

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 17, 1925 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

[Rundbrief]1
Budapest, January 17, 1925

Dear friends,

The events in Vienna found me unprepared. My reaction to Rank's letter consisted of an amicable reply, as is appropriate in the case of a ruefully returning “enfant prodigue.”2 But I don't need to conceal from you the fact that it will still take considerable time before I regain the old unconditional trust with respect to Rank. I thank the Berliners for being so kind as to send their reply to Rank.3 I am refraining from doing the same myself, because my letter contains nothing significant, other than my joy about his conversion. I think Ernest will share our view. I found Rank's response4 satisfactory.

I received a detailed letter from Radó, in which he lays out his plan for regulating working relations among the editors. I believe Radó is enthusiastically with the cause, and I hope that he will develop into a good editor, especially if friend Eitingon supervises his activity.

I congratulate Ernest for the brilliant successes that the English group has shown in the way of translation accomplishments. The publication of Herr Professor's works in English will bring in its wake an extraordinary advancement of the psychoanalytic movement. How urgently necessary these publications are I know especially from the analysis of two English colleagues who are presently with me and have up to now had to make do with half an understanding of the German original.

Aichhorn from Vienna recently spoke in our Society; he acquainted us with the principles of the care of youth (especially with the treatment of wayward [youth]). He also gave a well-attended public lecture.

In the next session Dr. Inman (one of the Englishmen, an ophthalmologist from Portsmouth) will give us a lecture about the relations between ophthalmology and psychoanalysis.5 He came here with autodidactically acquired knowledge and has developed greatly in the course of the four months he has spent here, so that the British group will probably deem him worthy of membership there.

With

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.