Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see papers related to the one you are viewing…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When there are articles or videos related to the one you are viewing, you will see a related papers icon next to the title, like this: RelatedPapers32Final3For example:

2015-11-06_09h28_31

Click on it and you will see a bibliographic list of papers that are related (including the current one). Related papers may be papers which are commentaries, responses to commentaries, erratum, and videos discussing the paper. Since they are not part of the original source material, they are added by PEP editorial staff, and may not be marked as such in every possible case.

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Freud, S. (1925). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, March 20, 1925. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 209-210.

Freud, S. (1925). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, March 20, 1925. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 209-210

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, March 20, 1925 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, March 20, 1925
IX., Berggasse 191

Dear friend!

I advise you against it. Don't do it. Your experiences and experiments are certainly no more striking or unobjectionable than what has been set down about it in the literature, to which one has not wanted to grant one's faith up to now. So, the only thing new in your lecture would be the personal factor and the personal effect that would have to proceed from it. With it you are throwing a bomb into the psychoanalytic edifice, which will certainly not fail to explode. But we are in agreement in [our] not wanting to hasten this perhaps unavoidable disturbance in development.

Abraham has announced himself with his wife for Easter. But I will probably ask him not to visit me. I am too tired from the more than six months' work and the incessant treatment with its torments, so that I would like to take a rest over Easter in Vienna, or elsewhere, free from responsibilities. Abraham is an optimist, rather presumptuous in his relations with people, and he evidently cannot see eye to eye with the demands of my condition.2 You yourself don't need to see the announcement of a worsening of my condition in this communication. I am in a similar position as our poor Austria; I suffer the pains of rehabilitation, about which it has by no means yet been established whether it will succeed.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.