Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To review the glossary of psychoanalytic concepts…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Prior to searching for a specific psychoanalytic concept, you may first want to review PEP Consolidated Psychoanalytic Glossary edited by Levinson. You can access it directly by clicking here.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Ferenczi, S. (1925). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, April 18, 1925. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 213-214.

Ferenczi, S. (1925). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, April 18, 1925. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 213-214

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, April 18, 1925 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

[Rundbrief]1

Budapest, April 18, 1925

Dear friends,

The main event of the last month is the success of the psychoanalytic course arranged for physicians and medical students, something halfway between popular lectures and an academic course of study. In the meantime, to be sure, the Society sessions are resting, since we are all working so hard that we can't sacrifice more than two evenings a week for the common good.

The Congress will, I hope, be well attended by Hungary; everyone hopes for the presence of Herr Professor and promises not to be a burden to him there in any way. The other group leaders could also instill the same attitude in their members.

I think, dear Karl, that you are handling the case of Groddeck2 somewhat too rigidly, quite in contrast to your otherwise skillful diplomacy, which is praised by everyone. He is an original, whom one should allow to go his own way in side issues; the main thing is that he is a true adherent, and a respectable person to boot. He does not do pure psychoanalysis, but rather utilizes a not unskilled mixture of various therapeutic measures. It was perhaps not very tactful, even cocky, when he gave an example in public of his own free associations, but with him, cockiness is really only an exaggeration of courage, which he does not lack. He can be influenced by some criticism; threatening him with paragraphs would certainly only make him run wild.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.