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Ferenczi, S. (1925). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, May 16, 1925. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 216-217.

Ferenczi, S. (1925). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, May 16, 1925. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 216-217

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, May 16, 1925 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

[Rundbrief]1

Budapest, May 16, 1925

Dear friends:

I had the pleasure of making an excursion to Vienna with Eitingon on Herr Professor's birthday for the general meeting of the Verlag, and to convince myself of the great progress in his recuperation. Both Eitingon and I determined that, on the two evenings of our being together, the good mood of the prewar (pre-illness) time prevailed, and we were particularly pleased about the Professor's astonishing intellectual freshness and productivity. We expressed the hope that he would appear at the Congress, but we could not get a binding promise. I cannot leave unmentioned the fact that Fräulein Anna is proving more and more to be a full-fledged member of our Committee; I must single out in particular her shrewd objectivity in personal as well as practical questions.

We also participated in a portion of the session of the Vienna Society, and we ascertained that a new and fresh spirit has moved in there, especially through the diligence and liveliness of the young members. Rank related to both of us, this time also to me, in a very reserved manner; he seemed so very dominated by his personal (neurotic) conflicts that, despite much effort, we were unsuccessful in moving him to a discussion about scientific questions.

The question of the membership of Miss Newton, that is to say, permission for her to attend the meetings of the New York Psychoanalytic Society, seems to be kicking up a great deal of dust in America. Brill published an attack in a New York newspaper on the lay analysts, which is considered to be too general and does not make a proper distinction between trained and untrained lay analysts.

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