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Freud, S. (1926). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, January 26, 1926. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 247-248.

Freud, S. (1926). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, January 26, 1926. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 247-248

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, January 26, 1926 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, January 26, 1926
IX., Berggasse 19

Dear friend,

It is true, even the consequences of the flu are eventually over, and I am again the way I was.

You have, with unjustified urgency and neglect of our agreement, sent me a packet of dollars, the receipt of which I must confirm—without any other concession.

Your letter of today expresses your willingness, deserving of thanks, to ease as much as possible the travails of the ceremony which lies ahead. I have since allowed myself to be convinced by my family that I can do nothing better than to take up the yoke with clenched teeth. Traveling is too burdensome for me, long absence is costly, especially hated formalities (on the part of the university, the city, etc.) are certainly not to be feared. To the earlier considerations comes a new one, that a general meeting of the corporation is supposed to take place around the same time. So, I will stay, and count on the forbearance of all those who call themselves friends. On the occasion of the discussion of the Abraham volume of the Zeitschrift, I learned from Storfer that one volume each of both of our periodicals1 is supposed to be dedicated to me. I find that unobjectionable, if it happens in a dignified way, i.e., the introductory statement is limited to a minimum, so that one avoids the tactlessness of having oneself, as the publisher, celebrated in one's own organ; the scientific contributions on such occasions customarily show clearly the disadvantageous influence of provocation, but they retain their affective value as signs of eagerness.

The Abraham volume should, according to my suggestion, appear as soon as possible, that is, before mine, and doesn't need to contain anything other than the reports on the funeral orations in the groups which were given precedence as official by Jones.

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