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Ferenczi, S. (1926). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, Sunday, June 20. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 266.

Ferenczi, S. (1926). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, Sunday, June 20. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 266

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, Sunday, June 20 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Budapest, I. Martonhegyi ut 45.
Villa Montana
Sunday, June 20
[postmark: 926 Jun 21]1

Dear Professor,

About to read through Rank's break2 with a critical eye, I came upon something right at the beginning, about which it does not seem super fluous to determine its factuality. Rank likes to talk about the fact that he is “in the comfortable position” of being able to refer to your words; among other things, he calls it a “Freudian technique” when one has to terminate obsessional neurotics; I know nothing about any such Freudian technique, so I ask you to indicate to me what he is alluding to. In the end, is it only a matter of your establishing a compulsion to analyze on the part of some patients?

The passage in question is on page eighteen of Rank's book.—

Have you perhaps had time to look at Dr. Franklin's paper on epilepsy?

With kind regards to all.

Yours,

Ferenczi

Notes to "Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, Sunday, June 20"

1 Letter with perforated flap; the address is on the reverse, and that is why the postmark has been preserved.

2 In the original, the “r” in this word [Bruch] has been underlined four times, and an exclamation point has been set over the letters. What is evidently intended is to call attention to a slip of the pen involving the German Bruch (break) and Buch (book) [Trans.].

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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