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Freud, S. (1926). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, September 13, 1926. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 276-277.

Freud, S. (1926). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, September 13, 1926. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 276-277

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, September 13, 1926 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Semmering, September 13, 1926

Dear friend,

No, it is certainly: muore.

The journalist and poet George Sylvester Viereck1 (Macfadden's Building), whom I like very much, has applied for the translation in America. (He is an illegitimate Hohenzollern.) I have transferred it to him. If you come to an understanding with him, you will get to know an interesting person.

Many thanks for the hint about Groddeck's 60th birthday. Will think about it.

I don't know anything about Glover, other than what Jones has communicated: coma diabeticum, nothing about the background.

I am now maintaining a very amicable correspondence with Havelock Ellis, who sent me a book by the American Isaac Goldberg, which deals with his person.2

The last few weeks here were very nice and actually enjoyable, despite prosthesis. I am sending away both of my patients on the 15th. If weather permits, we intend to stay until the last day of the month.

I greet you, your dear wife, and the Groddecks cordially.

Yours,

Freud

Notes to "Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, September 13, 1926"

1 George Sylvester Viereck (1884-1962), American journalist, writer, and editor, born in Munich. His translation of the Lay Analysis did not come about (see letter 1076, n. 1). See Viereck's representation of Freud in Glimpses of the Great (London, 1930). The Freud-Viereck correspondence is available in the Library of Congress.

2

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