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Ferenczi, S. (1927). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 9, 1927. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 293-297.

Ferenczi, S. (1927). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 9, 1927. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 293-297

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 9, 1927 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

[Rundbrief]1

Internationale Zeitschrift für Psychoanalyse

Herausgegeben von Prof. Dr. Sigm. Freud

Redigiert von Dr. M. Eitingon Dr. S. Ferenczi und Dr. Sándor Radó

New York, January 9, 1927

Dear friends,

I thank you for the Rundbriefe and continue my report. Of the psychologists in America, Dr. Watson, the behaviorist,2 is probably the most active. In the “New School for Social Research,” where I am also lecturing, he gave a series of lectures about his doctrine, which essentially consists of the application of Pavlov's experiments on conditioned reflexes on human “behavior” in general. In completely failing to realize the complicatedness of “behavior3 (that is probably the best translation of the word behaviourism4), and without the slightest sense for the historical, in complete denial of the significance of heredity on top of that, he thinks he has theoretically solved the whole problem of the psychic with the aid of the simplest experiments which he performed on animals, newborns, and children. Indeed, he considers himself called upon, also in a prophylactic regard, to be able to replace all psychology, naturally also psychoanalysis. In reality, in his behavioristic experiments he unconsciously—or in mis-perceiving the sources of his knowledge—utilizes the knowledge that he gained from analytic sources. After ending his course of instruction, he organized a discussion in the school, to which he invited Adolf Meyer (Johns Hopkins University),5 William A. White (Washington),6 Dr. Edward Kempf (New York), Jelliffe, and Blumgart.7

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