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Ferenczi, S. (1927). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, November 13, 1927. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 328-329.

Ferenczi, S. (1927). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, November 13, 1927. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 328-329

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, November 13, 1927 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Dr. S. Ferenczi

vii., Nagydiofa-Utca 3.1

Budapest, November 13, 1927

Dear Professor,

You will certainly already have thought that my long silence is no coincidence. Well, since the cause has already—I think—for the most part been removed, I can write to you again. The nocturnal disturbances of my well-being have “afflicted” me again since my return home, so that during the day (despite significant diminution of my work hours) I only just acceded to the demands of unavoidable activity, but lacked any desire or strength for other work or correspondence. I made an exception with regard to Society matters, which I took up out of a feeling of duty.—I evidently bear bodily inactivity badly; this insight then also helped me toward rational therapy, which brought considerable success for the time being. Calisthenics and breathing exercises brought better nights—along with that, also improvement in my energy and desire for work. I will let the final decision about my plan for the future depend on, among other things, whether this improvement continues.

To get back to your latest news, I thank you especially for the kind words that you wrote to me on the occasion of the publication of the “Introduction” to the American Lay Analysis. I don't recall anymore the wording of that introduction; but I think I know it to the extent that it cannot have contained anything other than what I have been thinking and preaching for twenty years: the thanks that we owe you for the light that you brought to the darkness of knowledge about man.

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