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Ferenczi, S. (1927). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, December 20, 1927. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 329-330.

Ferenczi, S. (1927). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, December 20, 1927. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 329-330

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, December 20, 1927 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Dr. S. Ferenczi

vii., Nagydiofa-Utca 3.

Budapest, December 20, 1927

Dear Professor,

In fact, the consistently bad nights that have been going on for a long time have made me morose. I did [not] want to bother you, or anyone else, with my burdensome “illness reports.” It still has to do with something not very palpable: a breathing disturbance, which always appears at night and which consists of a kind of tiring of the activity of expiration. I awaken with a severe headache, or also half frozen;—a swallow of warm coffee suffices to restore me—but for the next day I am functional to the extent that I can take care of my hours only with considerable attentiveness. I try all kinds of internal and external palliative remedies—usually one or the other helps me. I don't want to start up with the internists; friend Lévy has the sure talent to make one hypochondriacal.—At the moment I am reasonably all right again.—

With all that, psychoanalysis, also therapeutically, gives me more and more satisfaction. One evidently has to get as old as I to gain the proper familiarity and the technique which is free of excesses, and still capable of alteration. I am sometimes sorry that I waste my hard-earned knowledge on foreigners who pay well, instead of handing it over to younger colleagues.

Nothing special is going on in the family. The mood is dominated by the usual Christmas preparations.

Apropos Christmas! I wanted to come to you, but this time I decided to get complete rest; I am staying in this country—and, verily, am feeding myself!1 I await—I hope, favorable!—news from you, Fräulein Anna, and the rest of the members of the family.

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