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Ferenczi, S. (1927). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, August 16, 1927 [1928]. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 345-346.

Ferenczi, S. (1927). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, August 16, 1927 [1928]. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 345-346

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, August 16, 1927 [1928] Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Budapest,
August 16, 1927 [1928]1

Dear Professor,

The psychoanalysis of a case with mild manic-depressive cycles gave (and gives) me the opportunity to recall your ideas about “psychological time.”2 It became evident to me that the manic (in whom anxiety has been totally shut off) becomes, so to speak, “simultaneous” in his entire associative activity; his ability to communicate only limps along with difficulty behind the impressions that storm over him. In the anxiety-free manic phase he sometimes suddenly becomes “enlightened.” He really resembles the bird which can be in two (or many) places at the same time.3

In contrast to this, in times of anxiety, he is, like every melancholic, especially ponderous in thinking—he is persecuted by a single thought, which he cannot mitigate in a compromising fashion by comparison with others, etc.

I was thinking that I should share this triviality with you, especially since I hope that you will perhaps be occasioned by it to occupy yourself further with your extremely significant idea.—

I can imagine how calming an effect Dr. Burlingham's departure has had on both of the villas at the Semmering. Dr. Amsden behaved, as usual, very skillfully and tactfully.

I am still working six hours a day—next week (on the 23rd) Rickmann,4 whom you sent to me, will be added to this. I am always pleased to be recommended by you.

With kind regards from all of us.

Yours,

Ferenczi

What do you think about the size of Rickmann's hourly fee?5 [I] request in this regard a brief but mailed reply, which I would like to get before his arrival.

Thanks.

F[erenczi].

Notes to "Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, August 16, 1927 [1928]"

1 This letter was in the folder for 1927. Balint noted by hand under the place designation, “Error: correct, Baden-Baden.” However, the content of the letter (Dr. Burlingham's departure from the Semmering; a postscript which could relate to that of the previous letter) suggests that the place is given correctly but that the date was written incorrectly. An examination of the stationery and ink favors placing the letter here.

2 The ideas were evidently communicated by word of mouth.

3

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