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Ferenczi, S. (1929). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, February 11, 1929. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 362-363.

Ferenczi, S. (1929). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, February 11, 1929. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 362-363

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, February 11, 1929 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Budapest, February 11, 1929

Dear Professor,

1.   I anticipate with interest the patient announced by you.—

2.   In order to deprive Jones of any possibility of “personal discrimination,” I am now also in favoi of the Paris trip and will write to Eitingon to that effect.1

3.   I am receiving reports from America as a result of which Wittels has gained the sympathy of the New York group by virtue of statements in opposition to lay analysis. He lets himself be referred to everywhere as your “right hand.”—

Even Schilder2 is said to be behaving overcautiously, indeed, occasionally ambivalently, which contributes to the increase in his popularity. It would be good if Wittels's real significance were somehow made public.—

The trip home from Vienna was adventurous; I didn't arrive in Budapest until four o'clock in the morning, instead of half past nine—but the train was well heated.—I am very pleased that you are well.

Cordially,

Ferenczi

Notes to "Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, February 11, 1929"

1 The meeting around April 6, 1929, in Paris about questions of lay analysis and the IPA; present were Eitingon, Ferenczi, Anna Freud, Jones, and Ophuijsen.

2 Paul Schilder (1886-1940), M.D. and Ph. D., noted Viennese philosopher, neurologist, and psychiatrist. He was a co-worker of Wagner-Jauregg from 1918 to 1928 and became a professor in 1925. He was a member of the Vienna Society from 1919 to 1932 and in 1929 became the head of the division for the treatment of psychoses in its outpatient clinic. From 1929 on he made several visits to the United States, and in 1932 he finally emigrated to New York and became a member of the Society there. In 1930 he became clinical director of the psychiatric division of Bellevue Hospital and research professor of psychiatry at New York University College of Medicine. In 1935 he founded the New York Society of Psychology. Along with his well-known works on the bodily schema, he concerned himself with, among other things, the relation of psychoanalysis and psychiatry, hypnosis, group therapy, and the treatment of psychotic children. See Mühlleitner, Lexikon, pp. 286-288.

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