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Freud, S. (1929). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, March 5, 1929. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 364.

Freud, S. (1929). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, March 5, 1929. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 364

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, March 5, 1929 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, March 5, 1929
IX., Berggasse 19

Dear friend,

I think I can anticipate Eitingon's warm thanks here for your group's expenditure on behalf of the Verlag. The amount, as well as the spirit, are equally deserving of recognition.

Be tolerant of Jones. He demands this subordination to his wishes in consideration of his 50th birthday (January 1 of this year) and the misfortune in his family,1 certainly childish, but hardly to be rebuffed! Giving in on this point doesn't mean that one has to acquiesce to him in all other matters. Your staying away would spoil a great deal, for the greatest tension within the former Committee does, after all, exist between you and him.

Some time ago I brought myself to compose an introductory article for the issue of the Zeitschrift which has been dedicated to him.2 It was not very easy.

On Sunday, the 10th of the month, I will go to Berlin with Anna for the long-anticipated adjustment of the prosthesis. Stay: one to two weeks; residence: Sanatorium Tegel.

With kind regards for you and Frau G.

Yours,

Freud

Notes to "Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, March 5, 1929"

1 The death of his daughter Gwenith (b. 1920) of broncho-pneumonia in February 1928; to that was added his wife's falling ill from a lung infection at year's end 1928-29, and his own falling ill from neuralgia or rheumatism, intensified by two attacks of influenza—all this without Jones's interrupting his work. “The past months since Christmas have been among the hardest in my life” (Jones to Freud, Freud/Jones, May 28, 1929, p. 659).

2 Freud 1929a, in no. 2/3 of the Zeitschrift (15 [1929]: 147f.).

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