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Ferenczi, S. (1930). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 5, 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 379.

Ferenczi, S. (1930). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 5, 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 379

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 5, 1930 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Internationale Psychoanalytische Vereinigung International Psycho-Analytical Association Association Psychanalytique Internationale

Budapest, January 5, 1930

Dear Professor,

The editor of one of the better Hungarian daily newspapers (Pesti Napló),1 who is not inimicably disposed toward psychoanalysis and has already been of some service to us, called me up yesterday and asked me if he, too, like the “Neue Freie Presse,” might publish a few pages of your new book in Hungarian translation, naturally with reference to the source. I promised him to get your permission, if possible; so, I request your kind reply. I will monitor the correctness of the translation.

The Feldmannian attack on my part has already been published, and I eagerly await its repercussions.

Many thanks for both books, which I treasure as the most beautiful New Year's gifts. I read Anna's book2 with unalloyed joy; it combines all the advantages of her style: superiority, intelligence, moderation, intellect, and humanity. Her maturity is really admirable. I am pleased that she wants to visit us, and am waiting in suspense for further information about her travel plan. Would she like to give a public lecture?—Or should we be satisfied with a lecture in the Society? May I put her up as my guest in a good hotel, or does she want to stay with Kata?

N.B.: I was always aware of the friendliness on your, Anna's, and Eitingon's part; the “final elimination” of my presidency had more to do with the fact that my interests were diverted from the politics of science in the meantime.

If you have time, please don't forget, Herr Professor, to return to the scientific questions that I raised. I then hope, on the occasion of my reply, also to be able to return to the impressions that I owe to Professor's book (Civilization and Its Discontents).

Many kind New Year's greetings to you and all your dear ones.

Ferenczi

Notes to "Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 5, 1930"

1 Possibly either Lajos Hatvany (see letter 685 and n. 4), the founder of Pesti Naplo, or its chief editor at the time, Sándor Mester (1875-1958).

2 Einführung in die Psychoanalyse für Pädagogen: Vier Vorträge [Introduction to Psychoanalysis for Teachers: Four Lectures] (Stuttgart, 1930).

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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