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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Freud, S. (1930). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, January 11, 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 380-381.

Freud, S. (1930). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, January 11, 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 380-381

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, January 11, 1930 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, January 11, 1930
IX., Berggasse 19

Dear friend,

My annoyance has dissipated. This reaction becomes less and less frequent in me with the motivation: it's no longer worth it. My conception of the state of affairs between us has remained the same; your letter also does not reveal any knowledge of the signs which support [it]. You are of such an honest nature that you always communicate in parapraxes what you want to conceal.

Here are the two grossest ones from your letter of January 5. I had suggested an exchange to you. Anna was supposed to come to Budapest sometime, and in exchange for that, you were supposed to pay us—or me—a visit. In your reply, you eagerly seize upon the first part of the suggestion; you don't say a word about the second one, which is the more important one to me. (Naturally, I can't repeat the wish now; forced kindnesses are, as is well known, worthless.) Then, further down in the letter, it says: I then hope, on the occasion of my reply, also to be able to return to the impressions that I owe to Professor's1 book (Civilization) That sounds, naturally, as though you are writing not to me but perhaps to Anna, and reveals an alienation, the extent of which would probably surprise you yourself.

In earlier letters you passed over some jocular and tender things that I wrote, and surrendered to an “objectivity” which is “new,” at least in our relations. I understand that the analysts' behavior toward you from New York on up to Jones's low gestures at the Congress must have embittered you.

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