Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To download the bibliographic list of all PEP-Web content…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Did you know that you can download a bibliography of all content available on PEP Web to import to Endnote, Refer, or other bibliography manager? Just click on the link found at the bottom of the webpage. You can import into any UTF-8 (Unicode) compatible software which can import data in “Refer” format. You can get a free trial of one such program, Endnote, by clicking here.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Ferenczi, S. (1929). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 381-382.

Ferenczi, S. (1929). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 381-382

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, January 1930 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Internationale Psychoanalytische Vereinigung International Psycho-Analytical Association Association Psychanalytique Internationale

Budapest, January 19301

Dear Professor,

I understand that my letter left you unsatisfied, since I perhaps didn't concern myself in sufficient detail with the problems to be dealt with. But I hope that this feeling will disappear when our correspondence once again gets into its old track. But I am pained by the fact that you have to be annoyed on my account, and even allow doubts about me to emerge in yourself—in the former case, because I would like to spare you unpleasant feelings, but in the latter, especially because this word casts a shadow, as it were, upon the hitherto unclouded relationship between you and me. Naturally, herein only unadorned honesty and openness on the part of both of us can help. I promise you to respond openly to all your questions or reservations.—

Feldmann has, as was to be expected, responded impudently, and does not intend to renounce his right to be called a psychoanalyst. I protested against this again, but did not follow in the personal realm, into which he seemed to entice me, and in my reply, I only said as much as: Feldmann has the nerve to drag the matter into the personal realm; he knows very well what reservations keep me from making my opinion of him public. I couldn't go any further without injuring analytic-medical discretion.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.