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Ferenczi, S. (1930). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, February 14, 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 387-389.

Ferenczi, S. (1930). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, February 14, 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 387-389

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, February 14, 1930 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Dr. S. Ferenczi

vii., Nagydiofa-Utca 3.

Budapest, February 14, 1930

Dear Professor,

I know you too well to fear that my long silence will be falsely construed; you will understand that the reply to your letter has required such a long reaction time. It was no small thing for me to see in black and white that an “ill feeling” could arise between us.—After the fact, I can tell you that my first reaction, which I didn't want to express by letter, was one of defiance. Now that this has been overcome, I can reply to you without affect that it is, in my view, not a matter of the reactivation of my earlier neurosis, but rather the fact that I could finally tell you that a certain inhibition on my part has constantly existed; I must rather designate the ability to tell you about it as progress, as the beginning of a freer, more uninhibited intercourse between us, thus, the end of a “subneurotic” epoch.

The inhibition of which I speak here has certainly contributed much to the fact that I was unable to give wholly free expression not only to my personal feelings, but also to certain scientific views. These are now beginning to consolidate, and my Oxford lecture, which I enclose in fair copy, is the beginning of this process.

In addition to this, my self-analysis led me to the insight that the childish sensitivity toward your facetious allusion to my getting old was actually the expression of a deep inner unease about my bodily ailments. My nightly rest disturbances (respiratory disturbance and spells of headache) have been returning almost uninterruptedly for more than a year and make me fear premature aging.

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