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Ferenczi, S. (1930). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, April 30, 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 391-392.

Ferenczi, S. (1930). Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, April 30, 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 391-392

Letter from Sándor Ferenczi to Sigmund Freud, April 30, 1930 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sándor Ferenczi

Dr. S. Ferenczi

vii., Nagydiofa-Utca 3.

Budapest, April 30, 1930

Dear Professor,

This letter would downright like to be a work of condensation: thanks for the friendly reception that you prepared for me, congratulations on the occasion of the anniversary that we are celebrating with you today (i.e., on May 6), and most heartfelt joy that I was permitted to see you so fresh and healthy at my last visit.

Unfortunately, I heard that in the meantime you had to withdraw for a few days to the Cottage Sanatorium on account of a transitory indisposition, but the news that you didn't have to postpone the Berlin trip reassured me completely about the innocuousness of the incident.—

Very often I think of the friendly and pleasant mood during the hours which I experienced the Sunday before last in your study, which is so familiar to me. I left with the conviction that my fear that my somewhat too independent manner of working and thinking could bring me into such painful conflict with you was exaggerated to a high degree. So, I will continue my work with heightened courage and hope assuredly that these little detours can never divert me from the main road on which I have been strolling at your side for almost twenty-five years now.

Enclosed a letter that a Hungarian patient sent to your daughter. She is an evidently incurable paranoia. She has a little son, whom I would have liked to remove from her proximity—for that reason I spoke about Fräulein Anna and Zulliger.

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