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Freud, S. (1930). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, September 16, 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 399-400.

Freud, S. (1930). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, September 16, 1930. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 399-400

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, September 16, 1930 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Grundlsee, September 16, 1930

Dear friend,

Above all, many thanks for your beautiful words on my mother's death. It had a strange effect on me, this great event. No pain, no mourning, which can probably be explained by the secondary circumstances, the advanced age, the sympathy with her helplessness at the end. At the same time a feeling of liberation, of being set free, that I also think I understand. I was not permitted to die as long as she was alive, and now I may. Somehow, in deeper layers, the values of life will have been markedly changed.

I was not at the funeral. Anna also represented me there. Today she went on a Swiss-Italian tour with her friend Dorothy, for which I must only wish her better weather.

The gruesome newspaper reports about my health will also have reached you. I find them very interesting as proof of the difficulty in thrusting upon the public and people in general what they don't like. They are, you see, the reaction to the Goethe Prize, and may warn us about the deception which resistance toward analysis has left behind in a practically palpable way. The same character of reaction is also demonstrated by Bumke's1 speech, which I know only from a note in the Neue Freie Presse, as well as by the increased activity in the Adlerian band of apes, where they are now publishing about the meaning of life (!) and [about] homosexuality.2 In short, the Goethe Prize will cost us dearly.

The new views about the traumatic fragmentation of mental life that you indicated seem to me to be very ingenious and have something of the great characteristic of the Theory of Genitality.

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