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Freud, S. (1933). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, April 2, 1933. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 448-449.

Freud, S. (1933). Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, April 2, 1933. The Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Sándor Ferenczi Volume 3, 1920-1933, 448-449

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Sándor Ferenczi, April 2, 1933 Book Information Previous Up Next

Sigmund Freud

Vienna, April 2, 1933
IX., Berggasse 191

Dear friend,

I heard with great regret that your convalescence, which had set in so nicely, recently underwent a disruption, but for that reason I greet all the more joyfully the fact that, according to every testimonial, you are again fully on the upswing. I ask you, let all the hard work rest for now; your handwriting really shows how tired you still are. The discussions between us about your technical and theoretical innovations can wait, and will only profit from lying fallow. It is more important to me for you to regain your health.

Now, as concerns the current motive for your writing, the motive of flight, I will gladly inform you that I am not considering leaving Vienna. I am not mobile enough, too dependent on treatment, little alleviations and comforts, also don't like to leave my property in the lurch, but I would probably also remain if I were intact and youthfully fresh. An emotional attitude naturally lies at the base of this decision, but there is also no lack of rationalizations. It is not certain that the Hitler regime will also overpower Austria; it is, of course, possible, but everyone believes that it will not reach the height of brutality here that it has in Germany. There is certainly no personal danger for me, and if you assume life in oppression to be amply uncomfortable for us Jews, then don't forget how little contentment life promises refugees in a foreign country, be it Switzerland or England. Flight, I think, would be justified only in the case of lethal danger, and incidentally, if they kill you, it's one kind of death like any other.

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