Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To review an author’s works published in PEP-Web…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

The Author Section is a useful way to review an author’s works published in PEP-Web. It is ordered alphabetically by the Author’s surname. After clicking the matching letter, search for the author’s full name.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Jones, E. (1909). Letter from Ernest Jones to Sigmund Freud, October 17, 1909. The Complete Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Ernest Jones 1908-1939, 29-31.
    

Jones, E. (1909). Letter from Ernest Jones to Sigmund Freud, October 17, 1909. The Complete Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Ernest Jones 1908-1939, 29-31

Letter from Ernest Jones to Sigmund Freud, October 17, 1909 Book Information Previous Up Next

Ernest Jones

18

17 October 1909
407 Brunswick Avenue
Toronto

Dear Professor Freud,

First let me hope that you had a pleasant voyage home, and that you enjoyed your American “trip”. Any fatigue from it should be compensated by the knowledge that you have struck a powerful blow for the cause in America, and Brill and I are very grateful to you for both impersonal and personal reasons.

I hope you had a good time in the mountains, and should be glad to hear sometime as to what you made of Putnam. He does not seem to have much practical knowledge of psycho-analysis, but he is a useful ally. He has this month published an article, in which he enthusiastically praises your work and method.1

I should like to say something about my personal inhibitions, but it is difficult in a short space. I am proposing to inflict a long account of them on Jung, who spoke to me on the subject, and if he thinks it worth while he can send it on to you. The following few words give the practical side of it. So far as I can judge my inhibitions, which I know could not have escaped your sharp eye, were never against your work or conclusions, but against the advisability of joining in your method of propagandism. I felt that a more consciously organised campaign would have had better results than blind advocacy on the part of everyone who took up the work. Naturally, as you will imagine, this attitude was at bottom determined by personal complexes. However, the outcome of the story is that about six or eight months ago2 I determined not only to further the cause by all the means in my power, which I had always decided on, but also to further it by whatever means you personally decided on, and to follow your recommendations as exactly as possible.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.