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Jones, E. (1911). Letter from Ernest Jones to Sigmund Freud, October 17, 1911. The Complete Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Ernest Jones 1908-1939, 116-119.

Jones, E. (1911). Letter from Ernest Jones to Sigmund Freud, October 17, 1911. The Complete Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Ernest Jones 1908-1939, 116-119

Letter from Ernest Jones to Sigmund Freud, October 17, 1911 Book Information Previous Up Next

Ernest Jones

17 October 1911
407 Brunswick Avenue
Toronto

Dear Professor Freud,

Well, I am safely home again, after a most inspiriting holiday. I am glad to say I found my wife distinctly better. Adolf Meyer had done her much good by talking to her very reasonably about my work. I broached the

- 116 -

subject of treatment to her, and in the joyful mood at my return she was surprisingly optimistic. Your opinion that there was a chance for her to get better carried very great weight, for she could hardly help living with me and not thinking highly of you. She said she would [go] do anything, [except] so long as she wasn't expected to believe things she couldn't believe, (i.e. have ideas forced on her against her will). Rather to my surprise she was very definite on the point that she would rather be treated by you than by anyone else, but I told her that very (un)likely1 that would be impossible but that you would judge best.

I shall never forget the kind way you talked to me in Weimar, and am more grateful than I can say. I went away that night overjoyed at the thought that she might get better. To be honest, however, I must say that on the following day I had a disagreeable dream, which after a difficult analysis showed the wish that she might die instead of getting better. I felt greatly relieved after having it out with myself, and ever since have been freer and happier than for years.

We have not talked over details yet, but I will let you know the arrangements when they are made. She

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