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Abraham, K. (1908). Letter from Karl Abraham to Sigmund Freud, April 30, 1908. The Complete Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Karl Abraham 1907-1925, 37.
    

Abraham, K. (1908). Letter from Karl Abraham to Sigmund Freud, April 30, 1908. The Complete Correspondence of Sigmund Freud and Karl Abraham 1907-1925, 37

Letter from Karl Abraham to Sigmund Freud, April 30, 1908 Book Information Previous Up Next

Karl Abraham

27A

Berlin
30 April 1908

Dear Professor Freud,

I am sorry to have to bother you with a question. Today I am sending the paper of my talk to Gaupp1 to be printed. I noted under the title of the work: “Paper read at the First Congress for Psycho-Analytical Research in Salzburg on 27.4.08.” Is that description all right with you, or would you prefer another? I would not like to give the Congress a name on my own authority. I will make the alterations you asked for in the proofs, which I am expecting in about a fortnight. Many thanks in advance!

Salzburg was good. I only have great regrets about Bleuler's behaviour.2 I am convinced that we cannot expect anything more from him towards our efforts.

With cordial greetings,

your gratefully devoted

Karl Abraham

Notes to "Letter from Karl Abraham to Sigmund Freud, April 30, 1908"

1 Robert Eugen Gaupp [1870-1953], German psychiatrist, professor in Tübingen [1906-1936]; editor of the Zentralblatt für Nervenheilkunde und Psychiatrie, in which Abraham's article then appeared.

2 From the beginning, Bleuler had great reservations about a psychoanalytic “movement”. Calling the Salzburg meeting a “congress” “represented an attitude which presently was to give his [Jung's] chief, Bleuler, a handle for criticism” (Jones, 1955: pp. 39-40). Bleuler's difficult relationship with Jung, who was, at that time, an enthusiastic advocate and promoter of such a movement, added to the strained atmosphere.

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