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Segal, H. (1985). Chapter 3: The Klein—Bion Model. Models of the Mind: Their Relationships to Clinical Work, 35-47.
   

Segal, H. (1985). Chapter 3: The Klein—Bion Model. Models of the Mind: Their Relationships to Clinical Work , 35-47

Chapter 3: The Klein—Bion Model Book Information Previous Up Next

Hanna Segal, M.D.

In my view, the Klein-Bion model that I am using combines the structural model discussed in the previous chapter with the interpersonal model discussed in the next chapter.

The model of the mind developed by Melanie Klein in terms of the paranoid-schizoid and the depressive positions is a development of Freud's structural model. When Klein began working in the 1920s she used Freud's structural model as the basis of her work. Her investigations of the origins of the superego and its detailed composition led to her later formulations. She investigated the growth of both the ego and the superego and the relationship between them in terms of the development of object relationships, external and internal. The study of early introjective and projective processes threw light on the structure of the ego as well as the superego—for instance, the enrichment of the ego by introjections and its impoverishment by projection into the superego.

The danger in presenting any model is that it is schematic—a skeleton without flesh. In presenting a model one cannot convey the infinite variety of human relationships and emotions. It also seems repetitive: for instance, in his last book Lebovici says Kleinian analysis is so repetitive, always dealing with the shift between the paranoid-schizoid and the depressive positions. In the same way one could say that the Oedipus complex is repetitive, since we are always concerned with it, and

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