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1. 
Brenman, E., Harvey, N. (2010). Meeting Eric Brenman: From the Series Encounters Through Generations. Instit. Psa UK AV Proj. Videostream, 1:9.
 

An interview with Eric Brenman and candidates and young analysts of the Institute of Psychoanalysis. The interview recorded in Hampstead, London.

2. 
Sohn, L., Minne, C. (2011). Meeting Leslie Sohn: From the Series Encounters Through Generations. Instit. Psa UK AV Proj. Videostream, 1:10.
 

An interview with Leslie Sohn. A project of the British Institute of Psychoanalysis.

3. 
Novick, K.K., Novick, J. (2017). Kerry Kelly Novick and Jack Novick on "The Essence of Masochism". PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1:20.
 

Kerry Kelly Novick and Jack Novick present their view of sadomasochism as a relational phenomenon with multiple determinants, importantly including painful experiences in early attachment relationships. They discuss their research on beating fantasies and the significance of such fantasies in individuals who develop a sadomasochistic way of functioning. They consider the challenges of working clinically with these problems and introduce their dual track model of development, which enables the clinician to conceptualise the aim of treating such patients as moving them from a closed system way of functioning to an open system way of functioning.

4. 
Perelberg, R.J. (2017). Rosine Jozef Perelberg on "A Father is Being Beaten": Constructions in the Analysis of Some Male Patients. PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1:19.
 

Rosine Jozef Perelberg traces the clinical and theoretical journey that led her to the formulations presented in this paper. Perelberg distinguishes between the murdered father configuration (when the individual cannot conceive of the role of the father in the primal scene) and the dead, symbolic father. The phantasy of “a father is being beaten” may frequently be found in the analysis of some male patients at the point of transition between these two configurations – that is, from the murdered father to the dead father. Perelberg discusses the connections of this line of thinking with Freud’s progressive discovery of the paternal function in the body of his work, and outlines some of the reasons for the relative neglect of the paternal function within the British psychoanalytic tradition.

5. 
Akhtar, S. (2016). 14 Proposals in Freud’s ‘The Unconscious' Current Status. PEP Videostream, 1:21.
 

Salman Akhtar revisits some of Freud’s central claims regarding the nature of the unconscious and examines their current status within and beyond psychoanalysis.

6. 
Nicholson, T. (2016). Freud’s Studies on Hysteria 120th Anniversary Debate: Part 1. A Brief history of Hysteria. PEP Videostream, 1:18.
 

Public engagement event at the Freud Museum London & funded by the UK National Institute of Health Research, to inform the general public about Hysteria – now known as conversion disorder or functional neurological disorder – and assess if Freud’s theories, specifically those in his seminal work ‘Studies on Hysteria’ are still relevant today. Initially there is a pair of lectures giving an introduction ‘Is Freud’s book Studies on Hysteria still relevant?’ – Debate aimed at the general public. Chaired by Dr Tim Nicholson (Institute of Psychiatry / Maudsley Hospital, London). Motion proposed by Richard Kanaan (Professor of Neuropsychiatry, Melbourne University) & Stephanie Howlett (Psychotherapist, Sheffield, UK). Motion opposed by Mark Edwards (Professor of Neurology, St George’s London) & Alan Carson (Senior Lecturer in Neuropsychiatry, Edinburgh University).

7. 
Bowlby, R. (2016). Freud’s Studies on Hysteria 120th Anniversary Debate: Part 2. A Brief Introduction to ‘Studies on Hysteria’. PEP Videostream, 1:19.
 

Public engagement event at the Freud Museum London & funded by the UK National Institute of Health Research, to inform the general public about Hysteria – now known as conversion disorder or functional neurological disorder – and assess if Freud’s theories, specifically those in his seminal work ‘Studies on Hysteria’ are still relevant today. Initially there is a pair of lectures giving an introduction ‘Is Freud’s book Studies on Hysteria still relevant?’ – Debate aimed at the general public. Chaired by Dr Tim Nicholson (Institute of Psychiatry / Maudsley Hospital, London). Motion proposed by Richard Kanaan (Professor of Neuropsychiatry, Melbourne University) & Stephanie Howlett (Psychotherapist, Sheffield, UK). Motion opposed by Mark Edwards (Professor of Neurology, St George’s London) & Alan Carson (Senior Lecturer in Neuropsychiatry, Edinburgh University).

8. 
Nicholson, T., Kanaan, R., Edwards, M., Howlett, S., Carson, A. (2016). Freud’s Studies on Hysteria 120th Anniversary Debate: Part 3. Debate on Freud and Breuer's 'Studies on Hysteria'. PEP Videostream, 1:20.
 

Public engagement event at the Freud Museum London & funded by the UK National Institute of Health Research, to inform the general public about Hysteria – now known as conversion disorder or functional neurological disorder – and assess if Freud’s theories, specifically those in his seminal work ‘Studies on Hysteria’ are still relevant today. Initially there is a pair of lectures giving an introduction ‘Is Freud’s book Studies on Hysteria still relevant?’ – Debate aimed at the general public. Chaired by Dr Tim Nicholson (Institute of Psychiatry / Maudsley Hospital, London). Motion proposed by Richard Kanaan (Professor of Neuropsychiatry, Melbourne University) & Stephanie Howlett (Psychotherapist, Sheffield, UK). Motion opposed by Mark Edwards (Professor of Neurology, St George’s London) & Alan Carson (Senior Lecturer in Neuropsychiatry, Edinburgh University).

9. 
Vermote, R. (2016). Rudi Vermote on "On the Value of 'Late Bion' to Analytic Theory and Practice". PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1:18.
 

Rudi Vermote explains how he became interested in W. R. Bion’s later work and discusses some of the reasons for the relative lack of attention to Bion’s later writings. He discusses his understanding of the implications of Bion’s shift from emphasizing transformations in knowledge to focusing on what he described as transformations in O. He considers some related psychoanalytic concepts and reflects on the implications of the development in Bion’s thinking for clinical practice.

10. 
Akhtar, S. (2016). Salman Akhtar on "A Third Individuation: Immigration, Identity, and the Psychoanalytic Process". PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1:17.
 

Salman Akhtar shares some of the personal experiences that led him to write about the impact of immigration on identity and on the psychoanalytic process. He gives examples of certain situations that may need to be handled slightly differently if the patient is an immigrant. He discusses some of the issues that need to be considered when working with a patient who is not speaking their mother tongue. He also emphasises the significance of the loss of the physical qualities of the mother country which serve a containing function.

11. 
Suzuki, T., Kitayama, O. (2016). Chronicling the history of Japan Psychoanalytic Society. PEP Videostream, 1:17.
 

In 1930, Freud gave his permission to psychologist Yaekichi Yabe for the setting up of a Tokyo Branch of the IPA and he opened in Tokyo, the Psychoanalytic House operated by the Japan Branch of the IPA. In 1933, Freud also granted his authorization to psychiatrist Kiyoyasu Marui to establish the Sendai Branch of the IPA.

In 1955, psychiatrist Heisaku Kosawa integrated the IPA branches to form the Japan Branch of the IPA, and founded Japan Psychoanalytic Society (JPS) as only psychoanalytic organization, authorized by IPA and JPS has been playing a leading role in Japan’s psychoanalysis.

JPS’s activities include setting up of a course for certifying psychoanalytic psychotherapists as the Society’s original qualification and relevant stipulated training method in compliance with IPA’s regulations and active international exchange by a large number of mid-career and young psychoanalysts, in addition to psychoanalytic study and psychoanalytic clinical practice, which has been the purpose of JPS.

12. 
Ungar, V. (2016). Virginia Ungar on 'The Toolbox of the Analyst's Trade: Interpretation Revisited'. PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1:15.
 

Virginia Ungar discusses the shift she perceives in her own technique and in analytic technique more generally in the way interpretation is used. She describes a move from a more active and assertive approach to a greater emphasis on observation and description. She highlights the role that the practice of infant observation can play in facilitating the capacity to observe, and identifies some of the obstacles to being able to wait and allow meaning to emerge without trying to force it.

13. 
Lichtenberg, .D. (2016). Joseph D. Lichtenberg on 'Listening, Understanding, and Interpreting: Reflections on Complexity'. PEP/UCL Top Authors Project, 1:16.
 

Joseph D. Lichtenberg outlines his theory of the five motivational systems involved in the processes of listening, understanding and interpreting in an analytic exchange and explains why he prefers this way of conceptualizing the analytic encounter to thinking in terms of a structural model. He discusses the place of other classical concepts such as defence and resistance in his theory. He gives an example of the phenomenon he has named a disciplined spontaneous engagement and discusses its relationship with the concept of enactment.

14. 
Etchegoyen, H., Ungar, V., Bronstein, C. (2014). An Interview with Horacio Etchegoyen. PEP Videostream, 1:15.
 

Argentinian psychoanalyst Dr Horacio Etchegoyen (1919-2016) is considered one of the most important psychoanalytic teachers and thinkers to have come out of Latin America, and had a significant impact on psychoanalysis there and around the world. In this film he talks to psychoanalysts Virginia Ungar (of the Buenos Aires Psychoanalytic Association) and Catalina Bronstein (of the British Psychoanalytical Society) about the development of his interest in psychoanalysis and in Kleinian thought in particular, the influence of key figures such as Enrique Pichon Riviere, Heinrich Racker and Donald Meltzer, and his development and teaching of key psychoanalytic concepts including envy and early transference.

15. 
Kantor, J., Crisanto, C., Hernández, M., Lemlij Saúl Peña, M., Belón, R., Fatule, R., Giannoni, D., Kantor, A. (2014). Cronicas del Psicoanálisis Peruano: Primera Parte. PEP Videostream, 1:16.
 

This documentary tells the story of the first four Peruvian psychoanalysts: Saúl Peña, Carlos Crisanto, Max Hernández and Moisés Lemlij. They went to London to do the psychoanalytic training at the middle 60´s. There they were in contact with key figures of psychoanalysis such as Anna Freud, Donald Winnicott, John Bowlby, Marion Milner, Joseph Sandler, Hanna Segal, Paula Heimann and many others, they became their analysts, teachers and supervisors. After completing their training, some of them stayed working as analyst for some years, but eventually they all return to Peru and developed the psychoanalytic movement there. With much effort they succeeded and founded the Peruvian Psychoanalytic Society in 1980, which till this day is the leading institution in Peruvian psychoanalysis.

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