Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: You can request more content in your language…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Would you like more of PEP’s content in your own language? We encourage you to talk with your country’s Psychoanalytic Journals and tell them about PEP Web.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1951). Psychoanalysis and the Constructive Forces in Man: A symposium sponsored by the Auxiliary Council to the Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis. Am. J. Psychoanal., 11(1):53-54.

(1951). American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 11(1):53-54

Psychoanalysis and the Constructive Forces in Man: A symposium sponsored by the Auxiliary Council to the Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis

Moderated by:
Harold Kelman, M.D.

The topic of this Symposium is Psychoanalysis and the Constructive Forces in Man. With my opening remarks I wish to introduce the subject and indicate the spirit of its meaning.

In an article in the March 4, 1951, Sunday New York Times entitled, “The One Question: Agreement with Russia?”, the writer, Mr. Taylor, an Oxford Don, said: “To put the argument on a more general plane, the way to reach agreement with the Russians is to have confidence in ourselves—confidence that we can conduct our political affairs with wisdom; confidence that human beings will not fall victims indefinitely to the fallacies of Communism; confidence that the democratic cause can always afford to be tolerant and patient … Nothing is lost by argument even if it goes on forever; after all argument is itself a form of agreement.”

How can we identify and increase our confidence in ourselves and in our fellow men? What is the nature of the democratic cause? How is it that argument is a form of agreement? These questions can best be answered by identifying some of the attributes of the democratic way.

For one thing the democratic process not only implies but clearly affirms the right and the responsibility to become informed. As you become informed you have the right to see alternatives. You have the responsibility to dare to make choices and to speak up and be heard according to your own convictions. You have the right to be silent or, put otherwise, you cannot be forced to be a false witness against yourself or others.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.