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Barbara, D.A. (1951). Psychoanalysis: Evolution and Development. By Clara Thompson, M.D. With the collaboration of Patrick Mullahy. Hermitage House. $3.. Am. J. Psychoanal., 11(1):77-80.

(1951). American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 11(1):77-80

Psychoanalysis: Evolution and Development. By Clara Thompson, M.D. With the collaboration of Patrick Mullahy. Hermitage House. $3.

Review by:
Dominick A. Barbara, M.D.

This book grew out of a series of lectures given for the past several years at the Washington School of Psychiatry in Washington, D. C., and the William Alanson White Institute in New York. In its full context, it is an historical survey and exposition of both theory and therapy, as developed by the psychoanalytical schools of Freud, Jung, Ferenczi, Adler, Meyer, White, Reich, Horney, Fromm, Sullivan and others. Included in the contents of this book are the following chapters:

1.   Evaluation of Freud's Biological Orientation

2.   Unconscious Processes and Repressions

3.   Resistance and Transference

4.   Theories about Anxiety

5.   Therapy in Psychoanalysis

“It has been the aim of this book,” Dr. Thompson states, “to trace the course of psychoanalytic development, to point out the paths which have led in the direction of progress and to criticize as impartially as possible the theories and experiments which have been unfruitful.” In recent years new trends and developments in psychoanalysis have emerged. As is usual in scientific progress, the new ideas are not accepted by all workers. With this in mind, Dr. Thompson contends that there is a conservative force tending to resist change and a progressive force pushing forward with impatience.

“Splits have occurred and each group tends to isolate itself from others,” she writes.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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