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Tip: To see Abram’s analysis of Winnicott’s theories…

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In-depth analysis of Winnicott’s psychoanalytic theorization was conducted by Jan Abrams in her work The Language of Winnicott. You can access it directly by clicking here.

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Kelman, N. (1975). The Transforming Self: New Dimensions in Psychoanalytic Process by David Shainberg, M.D., Intercontinental Medical Book Corporation New York, 1973.. Am. J. Psychoanal., 35(1):83-89.

(1975). American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 35(1):83-89

Book Reviews

The Transforming Self: New Dimensions in Psychoanalytic Process by David Shainberg, M.D., Intercontinental Medical Book Corporation New York, 1973.

Review by:
Norman Kelman, M.D.

In The Transforming Self: New Dimensions in Psychoanalytic Process David Shainberg has invited the reader to engage in a dialogue. I intend to respond. G. Wilson Knight has said that criticism is a judgement of vision. This is to be a critique rather than a review, the latter being, in my understanding, primarily interpretative. One reviewer (Silvano Arieti in The Academy) has called this book “an unusually worthwhile essay.” It is indeed that, in the large sense of essay. It is an attempt by Dr. Shainberg to accomplish what R. D. Laing states as his objective in The Politics of Experience when he says, “The truth I am trying to grasp is the grasp that is trying to grasp it.”

This is not a topical book in that the contemporary feminist revolution is never mentioned, nor is reference made to the man/woman distinction. Topical in a deeper way, it is part of a development in psychoanalysis that moves toward an abrogation of analysis. This development is consistent with the awareness in all the sciences that process and energy are the ground of all nature. The formula E = mc2 reflects the relationship between mass and energy, but the trend in the sciences of humanity appears to minimize the mc2 part of the equation. Heraclitus’ thought, that one cannot step into the same river twice, has been remembered, but his recognition of “harmony in contrariety, as in the case of the bow and the lyre” has often been ignored.

My central argument hinges on Dr.

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