Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see translations of this article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When there are translations of the current article, you will see a flag/pennant icon next to the title, like this: 2015-11-06_11h14_24 For example:

2015-11-06_11h09_55

Click on it and you will see a bibliographic list of papers that are published translations of the current article. Note that when no published translations are available, you can also translate an article on the fly using Google translate.

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Shane, E. Shane, M. (1990). Object Loss and Selfobject Loss: A Consideration of Self Psychology's Contribution to Understanding Mourning and the Failure to Mourn. Ann. Psychoanal., 18:115-131.

(1990). Annual of Psychoanalysis, 18:115-131

Object Loss and Selfobject Loss: A Consideration of Self Psychology's Contribution to Understanding Mourning and the Failure to Mourn

Estelle Shane, Ph.D. and Morton Shane, M.D.

The child's experience in mourning the death of a significant other has been the subject of considerable interest and debate in the psychological literature for many decades (e.g., Bowlby, 1960, 1973, 1980; A. Freud, 1960; Wolfenstein, 1966, 1969; E. Furman, 1974, 1986; Gardner, 1979; Herzog, 1980; Altschul, 1988). In this paper we are concerned with a particular facet of this topic, the role of adequate parental support in facilitating the mourning process, and with the contributions of self psychology to an understanding of this function. Therefore, the clinical material that follows, as well as our discussion of it, is restricted to that which most closely pertains to the topics of concern here, that is, the lingering effects of the child's profound response to the death of a parental figure as they are manifested in the analysis of an adult patient and the means by which those effects, if unmitigated by parental support, are defended against and disguised over the course of the person's life.

Brief vignettes from the analysis of child patients are included principally to support and illustrate this central thesis.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.