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Mahony, P.J. (1992). Sigmund Freud: Oeuvres Complêtes/psychanalyse. Vol. 3 (1894–1899): Edited and translated by André Bourguignon, Pierre Cotet, Jean Laplanche, et al. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1989, 304 pp., Fr. 195.. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 40:267-270.

(1992). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 40:267-270

Sigmund Freud: Oeuvres Complêtes/psychanalyse. Vol. 3 (1894–1899): Edited and translated by André Bourguignon, Pierre Cotet, Jean Laplanche, et al. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1989, 304 pp., Fr. 195.

Review by:
Patrick J. Mahony, Ph.D.

A complete French edition of Freud's psychoanalytic works is finally appearing, after being held up by some three decades of diverse conflicts (I have always held that the most immediate proof for many doctrines of psychoanalysis is to be found within its own history of evolution and devolution). Apart from the present volume, two others in the series have been published—Volume 13, and an overall booklength programme of editorial and linguistic principles entitled Traduire Freud (1989; reviewed in this issue). We should understand that the transatlantic publication is a monumental event well waiting for, and not only because it surpasses the Standard Edition. Our Gallic colleagues have evinced an exquisite, abiding awareness that psychoanalysis—by virtue of its clinical, theoretical, and applied dimensions—is par excellence a discipline of translation.

Before considering the French enterprise, the Anglo-American reader of Freud might bear in mind the following facts, which, depending on the link among his narcissistic, linguistic, and patriotic sensitivities, may prove unsettling: (1) Strachey's Standard Edition of Freud's work is an overdetermined title and stands as the greatest misnomer in psychoanalysis today. Laudable as Strachey's efforts were, he nevertheless brought out a standardized, not standard edition, often shading out original nuances and falling far short of requirements set down by bibliographical specialists, such as consulting available holographs, etc.

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