Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To zoom in or out on PEP-Web…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Are you having difficulty reading an article due its font size? In order to make the content on PEP-Web larger (zoom in), press Ctrl (on Windows) or ⌘Command (on the Mac) and the plus sign (+). Press Ctrl (on Windows) or ⌘Command (on the Mac) and the minus sign (-) to make the content smaller (zoom out). To go back to 100% size (normal size), press Ctrl (⌘Command on the Mac) + 0 (the number 0).

Another way on Windows: Hold the Ctrl key and scroll the mouse wheel up or down to zoom in and out (respectively) of the webpage. Laptop users may use two fingers and separate them or bring them together while pressing the mouse track pad.

Safari users: You can also improve the readability of you browser when using Safari, with the Reader Mode: Go to PEP-Web. Right-click the URL box and select Settings for This Website, or go to Safari > Settings for This Website. A large pop-up will appear underneath the URL box. Look for the header that reads, “When visiting this website.” If you want Reader mode to always work on this site, check the box for “Use Reader when available.”

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Richards, A.D. (2003). JAPA: Ten Years. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 51(4):1115-1118.

(2003). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 51(4):1115-1118

From the Editor

JAPA: Ten Years:

Arnold D. Richards

As I prepare to say farewell to the editorship of JAPA, I realize that I am much more aware than I was when I undertook the post what a monumental effort a journal like this is. Over the past ten years we have published forty issues and two supplements—13,359 pages of some of the finest psychoanalytic thought of our time. We have evaluated—read and carefully reviewed—almost 1500 submissions, some of them several times over. Throughout, we have striven to foster the creativity and generativity of our field, encouraging and reaching out to an ever broader community of readers and contributors. None of this happens without work, and a scholarly periodical of JAPA's caliber is the fruit of constant, intimate, and complicated collaboration. Our team starts with sixty elected members of the editorial board, twenty-eight editorial associates, seven associate editors, and two book review editors, and that is just the beginning.

Perhaps less obvious to our readers is the network of dedicated staff who work behind the scenes to produce, distribute, and market JAPA—our superb production team and manuscript editors, the secretarial assistants who provide endless and unstinting administrative support, and to varying degrees most of the administrative staff and board members of APsaA. Every single one of these people has had a hand in making JAPA what it is, and I have had to be forcibly restrained from naming each of them. Consideration of the sheer number of people it takes to make JAPA keeps an editor-in-chief from getting too cocky.

Still, since the name at the top of the masthead is mine, and since I'm speaking on behalf of my colleagues too, I feel entitled to crow a little. We are very proud of what we have accomplished, even if I must limit my bragging to just a few examples. Our first supplement, The Psychology of Women (44/Suppl.), coedited with Phyllis Tyson, sold out and had to go into a second printing. Published twenty years after the first supplement on the subject, it is still widely cited. Our second supplement, The Politics of Psychoanalysis (51/Suppl.),

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.