Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To keep track of most cited articles…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can always keep track of the Most Cited Journal Articles on PEP Web by checking the PEP Section found on the homepage.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Solomon, B.C. Solomon, D.S. (2009). Self-Organizing Complexity In Psychological Systems. Edited by Craig Piers, John P. Muller, and Joseph Brent. Psychological Issues Monograph 67. Lanham, MD: Jason Aronson, 2007, 186 pp., $28.60.. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 57(3):749-753.
   

(2009). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 57(3):749-753

Self-Organizing Complexity In Psychological Systems. Edited by Craig Piers, John P. Muller, and Joseph Brent. Psychological Issues Monograph 67. Lanham, MD: Jason Aronson, 2007, 186 pp., $28.60.

Review by:
Brenda Clorfene Solomon

David S. Solomon

This comprehensive volume is a wide-ranging collection of readings about complexity theory. The authors set out to illustrate how complexity theory can deepen and broaden neurobiological and psychological theories of the mind. Each of the six chapters is written by a different scholar with a different area of expertise. A useful glossary is included for those unfamiliar with nonlinear dynamics.

In chapter 1, Stanley Palombo suggests that complexity theory is the parent science of psychoanalysis. According to complexity theory, a living system evolves through an integrating series of reorganizations that raise it to new levels of structure and function. The psychoanalytic process promotes the self-organizing properties of the ideas and feelings that make up the contents of the patient's mind. All living things self-organize into patterns, and that cannot be predicted by the usual mathematical analysis. These patterns interact in dynamic ways responding to internal and environmental conditions.

The therapeutic process that frees the patient to respond optimally to the world is itself highly complex in intricate and often very delicate ways. A major aspect of all complex systems is that a relatively small change in input from the environment can lead to a major reorganization. In treatment small changes can affect the patient's mental structure at a level of increased complexity. Sudden and surprising changes in a patient during analysis are evidence of phase changes in the structure of his mental contents.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.