Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To restrict search results by languageā€¦

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

The Search Tool allows you to restrict your search by Language. PEP Web contains articles written in English, French, Greek, German, Italian, Spanish, and Turkish.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Gaensbauer, T.J. Jordan, L. (2009). Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Early Trauma: Interviews with Thirty Analysts who Treated an Adult Victim of a Circumscribed Trauma in Early Childhood. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 57(4):947-977.

(2009). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 57(4):947-977

Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Early Trauma: Interviews with Thirty Analysts who Treated an Adult Victim of a Circumscribed Trauma in Early Childhood

Theodore J. Gaensbauer and Leslie Jordan

Information on the long-term effects of early trauma and how such effects are manifested in treatment was obtained through interviews with thirty analysts who had treated an adult patient with a circumscribed trauma in the first four years of life. Childhood traumas fell into four categories: medical/accidental; separation/loss; witnessing a traumatic event; and physical/sexual abuse. Traumatic carryover was recorded in terms of explicit memories, implicit memories (somatic reliving, traumatic dreams, affective memories, behavioral reenactments, and transference phenomena), and global carryover effects (generalized traumatic affective states, defensive styles, patterns of object relating, and developmental disruptions). Linkages between the early trauma and adult symptomatology could be posited in almost every case, yet the clinical data supporting such linkages was often fragmented and ambiguous. Elements of patients' traumas appeared to be dispersed along variable avenues of expression and did not appear amenable to holistic, regressive reworking in treatment. The data did not support linear models of traumatic carryover or the idea that early traumatic experiences will be directly accessible in the course of an analysis. Factors that we believe help explain why traumatic aftereffects in our sample were so heterogeneous and difficult to track over the long term are discussed.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.